Protocol Protocol

  • Army Protocol

    Protocol for the most part is similar within all services but can vary. As such should a specific question arise regarding the US Army we strongly urge you to check with the Protocol Officer and also reviewing the most current revision of "A Guide To Protocol And Etiquette For Official Entertainment" (Pamphlet No. 600-60 published by the Headquarters Department of the Army Washington, D.C.)

    What is Protocol?

    Precedence, according to Webster is, “priority in place, time or rank.” In the government
    and military, precedence of individuals is usually fixed by rank, but may also be
    assigned based on other criteria such as position.

    The precedence of senior officials in government agencies is not always fixed, however,
    and may change from time to time depending on several factors, the most significant
    being the current administration.

    There is only one official precedence list and that is maintained by the Chief of
    Protocol, Department of State. The Department of Defense and service precedence lists
    reflect the precedence established by the State Department. These latter two lists, however,
    are expanded to include DoD and service-specific positions.

     

  • Air Force Protocol

    Protocol for the most part is similar within all services but can vary. The information presented here is used typically used by the United Air Force.  The information was gleaned (and is faithfully reproduced) a manual known as 'Till Wheels are Up' that was originally produced at Luke Air Force base.  We are not aware whether it is still in publication nor if it is available for dissemintation.  Neither are aware of a specific Air Force manual, order, or directive that outlines protocol for the Air Force.

    As such should a specific question arise regarding protocol we strongly urge you to check with the Protocol Officer.

    What is Protocol?

    Precedence, according to Webster is, ?priority in place, time or rank.? In the government and military, precedence of individuals is usually fixed by rank, but may also be assigned based on other criteria such as position.

    The precedence of senior officials in government agencies is not always fixed, however, and may change from time to time depending on several factors, the most significant being the current administration.

    There is only one official precedence list and that is maintained by the Chief of Protocol, Department of State. The Department of Defense and service precedence lists reflect the precedence established by the State Department. These latter two lists, however, are expanded to include DoD and service-specific positions.

     

     

  • Navy Protocol

    Protocol for the most part is similar within all services but can vary. The information presented here is used by not only the United States Navy but also the United States Marine Corps and the United States Coast Guard.  As such should a specific question arise regarding the particular service you are a member of we strongly urge you to check with the Protocol Officer and also reviewing the most current revision of "Social Usage and Protocol Handbook: A Guide for Personnel of the U.S. Navy"  (OPNAVINST 1710.7).

    What is Protocol?

    Precedence, according to Webster is, “priority in place, time or rank.” In the government
    and military, precedence of individuals is usually fixed by rank, but may also be
    assigned based on other criteria such as position.

    The precedence of senior officials in government agencies is not always fixed, however,
    and may change from time to time depending on several factors, the most significant
    being the current administration.

    There is only one official precedence list and that is maintained by the Chief of
    Protocol, Department of State. The Department of Defense and service precedence lists
    reflect the precedence established by the State Department. These latter two lists, however,
    are expanded to include DoD and service-specific positions.